In her article, Kersel has effectively highlighted the undeniable symptoms of a malfunction in contemporary archaeological praxis. She rightly points out that the goal of archaeology is not merely to dig (although that has long been seen as the most glamorous part of the process [see Gero 1985]), but to create new knowledge about the human past and responsibly curate the fruits of archaeological labor as a precious, irreplaceable resource for society at large. Yet, instead of flowing smoothly from the excavation site to the laboratory for detailed analysis and scientific publication, and thence to careful, perpetual curation and assured public access, the mountains of material culture unearthed every year from ongoing excavations are piling up, often untouched and unpublished, in government storerooms and improvised storage spaces all over the world. Add to that, the countless unpublished finds from massive nineteenth-and-twentieth-century excavations already languishing in those same storerooms, and...

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