The concept of the “network” has become increasingly popular in archaeology over the past two decades (see Mills 2017 for a helpful review). Composed of “nodes” (actors, locations, or assemblages) and “edges” (the connections or flows between different nodes), networks are used to formally represent a wide array of relationships between people, places, and things. In Mediterranean and Near Eastern archaeology, network theory has been invoked to understand phenomena as diverse as mobility, maritime connectivity, economic exchange, identity formation, knowledge production, and the development of shared cultural and religious practices across long distances (Malkin 2011; Leidwanger and Knappett 2018; Robson 2019; Leidwanger 2020).

In this intellectual milieu, it is unsurprising that networks have been used to depict the structure of the discipline of archaeology itself or its various subfields (Roberts et al. 2020). One recent contribution, for example, considers the development of survey...

You do not currently have access to this content.