In this book, Caroline Vout, Fellow and Director of Studies in Classics at Christ’s College, Cambridge University, and Director of the Museum of Classical Archaeology, provides the reader with a fresh glance at classical sculpture and its fortune across centuries to the present times.

The author draws on various fields, including narratology, reception studies, and art history, to tell the story of particular ancient artifacts, tracking them as far back as possible as singular objects or, more often, as a category, until the point when they achieve the highbrow status of classical art: “This book [. . .] traces the narrative that unfolds as ancient Greek and Roman artifacts are grouped first in sanctuaries, and then in new configurations, as they travel across cultures and time” (p. VII). It focuses on sculpture, the only massive group of artifacts that were consistently in the public eye from antiquity onward, and therefore...

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