On the occasion of announcing Harold Pinter as the 2005 recipient of the Nobel Literature Prize, the Swedish academy stated that Pinter's work “uncovers the precipice under everyday prattle and forces entry into oppression's closed rooms.”1 To be sure, Basil Chiasson attempts to do something similar in this ambitious effort, The Late Harold Pinter: Political Dramatist, Poet and Activist. Expanding the scope of his earlier scholarship, such as the article “Harold Pinter's 'More Precisely Political' Dramas, or a Post-1983 Economy of Affect,” Chiasson's book-length study is a rigorous and comprehensive examination of Pinter's artistic output and its political significance. Chiasson demonstrates an almost encyclopedic presentation of Pinter scholarship; moreover, the text's references to material from the Harold Pinter Archive provide great insight into Pinter's creative process and the scope of his political activism and influence. In other words, from the perspective of its scholarly merits, Chiasson's text is...

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