In an interview with Mel Gussow in 1971, Harold Pinter said that he was “quite exhausted being this Harold Pinter fellow. This is quite apart from being me.” When asked by Gussow who Harold Pinter is, Pinter replied, “He's not me. He's someone else's creation” (Conversations with Pinter [1994], 25). In other words, the abstraction that takes place in the study of an artist's work separates the person from the art. The subsequent analysis then creates a new entity to explain the work using the original artist's name. For anyone who is not Pinter, this makes it harder to distinguish where the writer ends, and the man extrapolated from the plays begins. What William Baker's study, Pinter's World: Relationships, Obsessions, and Artistic Endeavours, attempts to do is explore the personal interests, correspondence, and interactions of Pinter (principally from the British Library) to give the reader a broader understanding...

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