F. Scott Fitzgerald’s devotion to John Keats is widely known and well-recorded. The influence of the English poet on the American novelist has been explored in various articles and essays, as well as being a discussion point in Fitzgerald biographies. That said, Jonathan Bate’s decision to look at the life and works of these two literary lions alongside each other may, on first glance, seem strange. The century that separates England’s Regency era from the American Jazz Age is as vast, deep, and turbulent as the Atlantic Ocean itself. However, in the opening chapter of his book, Bate explains his approach, stating he has left cradle-to-grave biographies to others and is instead drawing for inspiration from Plutarch’s two-thousand-year-old The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans, first translated into English by Sir Thomas North in ten volumes beginning in 1579, a series that heavily influenced the plays of William...

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