As the clock approached midnight on 31 December 2020, commentators fretted endlessly over whether the entry of The Great Gatsby into the public domain would diminish its cultural standing. Already a slew of fresh adaptations—not to be confused with the new editions that James L. W. West III discusses in the preceding review-essay—were competing for media attention. Ready for purchase on New Year’s Day would be illustrated versions, modernized versions, even “mash-up” versions in which the familiar storyline was transposed into another genre, such as Kristen Briggs’s The Great Gatsby Undead, a self-published vampire take on the classic (or “revamped” as the back cover declares). As Annabel Gutterman wrote in Time that Christmas Eve, “When the copyright for Fitzgerald’s classic novel of greed, desire and betrayal expires, anyone will be able to publish the book and adapt it without permission from his literary estate, which has controlled the text...

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