“Hardly anyone knows him in Italy. In America, his name is very well known in all cities where literature matters the most.” These are the first two lines of an interview F. Scott Fitzgerald gave in December 1924 to an Italian magazine. “Mr. Gerald”—as the journalist called him, corroborating the thesis that the American writer was unknown to Italians—was in Rome “to give the last touches to a new novel, which is fruit of his deep psychological study of the sensitivity and liveliness of our Latin character” (Bruccoli and Baughman 72).1 As Anna Kérchy observes, “the changing meaning of a literary work certainly depends on the socio-historical context in which the interpretation takes place” (142). In this case, the meaning of The Great Gatsby, which came out two months after the publication of this interview, depended on the socio-historical context of Fascist Italy in the 1920s, during which...

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