In a 1981 essay in the New York Times, Gabriel García Márquez discusses his artistic patrimony, acknowledging his debt to two “great masters,” William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway, that pair of “North American novelists who [seem] to have the least in common.” To Faulkner, García Márquez attributes a nebulous impact on his “soul,” but from Hemingway, he claims to have learned matters of “craftsmanship,” the technical machinery in the “science of writing” (“Gabriel”). The timing of this essay makes it all the more curious that García Márquez should omit any mention of the similar debt that he owes to F. Scott Fitzgerald, and to his The Great Gatsby in particular. García Márquez's Chronicle of a Death Foretold was published in 1981, the same year as his New York Times essay, and this short novel reads in many ways as a protracted reworking of and response to Gatsby. The...

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