The Edith Wharton Review 39.1 opens with Deborah Snow Molloy’s discussion of Wharton’s 1927 novel Twilight Sleep, a work that sold well but received limited praise from contemporary critics. In contrast, current critical commentators, along with others writing on the novel in the last few decades, have found much interesting material to engage in their analyses of this work. “‘This killing New York life’: Geographies of Illness in Edith Wharton’s Twilight Sleep (1927)” draws on literary geography and the medical humanities to discuss the novel’s “crucial relationship between setting and mental health.” Molloy notes that the novel’s epigraph in the original German from Goethe’s Faust II, which has received little critical attention, introduces an “anxiety about place” from the first, and she builds on this idea to explore Wharton’s “use of literary space in Twilight Sleep to reflect the negative impact New York has upon the mental health...

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