The descent-based system of oppression called caste has been disturbingly absent from the broad multidisciplinary project of critical philosophy of race. At least two connections with caste should have been essential to examinations by the project: the genealogies and concepts of nature and man that produced racisms and those who exposed and would combat them. First, caste had held extraordinary significance for both race theorists like Nietzsche and antiracist thinkers like W. E. B. Du Bois. Second, the attention to colonialism in processes of race-making had constantly fallen also on the Indian subcontinent, whose postcolonialist theorists and subaltern historians have found a prominent place in the critical discussions of race. Yet caste has remained the isolated object of “South Asia studies,” while “India” and its native traditions as victims of—and in—the “West” alone has been registered in this project.

This special issue of the journal Critical Philosophy of Race is...

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