As articulated in the editors’ introduction, the aim of the collection, divided into two parts, is to “further demonstrate from a series of diverse perspectives precisely how and to what effect Cervantes exploits theatricality” (5). Best known as the author of Don Quixote, the contributors to this book demonstrate both individually and collectively the extent to which Cervantes’s love for the theatre imbues his oeuvre across genre.

Part One (“Alternate Theatricalities in Cervantes’s Drama”) commences with a chapter by Bruce R. Burningham, “Cervantes and the Simple Stage,” which encapsulates the rationale behind the overarching project with the observation that “Cervantes’s theatre is an enigma, if not an afterthought” (17). Burningham draws upon the simple stage as defined by Hollis Huston: “‘the circle the street performer opens in a crowd,’ a space paradoxically constituted by the very performance it is said to contain” (18). Cervantes struggled with the jongleuresque, a...

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