Bhayva Tiwari’s new book Beyond English: World Literature in India offers a fresh look at some of the core concepts that structure the field of world literature, moving “beyond English” to defamiliarize the languages through which Anglophone academia defines the “world” in world literature. We might say simplistically that the “world” of world literary studies is divided in two. One version approaches the world as a space of economic circulation, wherein literary works both register this reality memetically and participate in it as commodified objects of exchange. Famous champions of this approach include Edward Said (1993), Pascale Casanova (1999), Sara Brouillette (2007), and Lisa Lowe (2014). The other common approach treats the “world” as a philosophical or temporal unit that literature helps to sustain through its imaginative engagement with otherness. This is the version promoted by Pheng Cheah (2016) and Debjani Ganguly (2016), among others. Tiwari makes two critical moves...

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