Ayo A. Coly's book, Postcolonial Hauntologies, is a powerful gift to feminist theory. Her generous yet clear-eyed assessments of the field locate the thorniness of studying sexuality when all discussion of African women's bodies lead back to colonialism's pathologizing of it. As she argues, “colonial discourses compulsively ghost postcolonial African discursive engagements with the female body” (2). Building on and yet also away from anglophone and francophone African feminist scholarship that maintains a “silence about the sexual female body” (3), Postcolonial Hauntologies insists on articulating not just sexual pleasure and agency for and as African feminism, but on the centering of African female sexual embodiment as a disruption and recalibration of the rhetoric of the postcolonial state that has deployed the African female body as metaphor and symbol like the West did before it. In doing so, she offers a blueprint for studying black women's sexuality and embodiment that...

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