In Weeping for Dido, Marjorie Curry Woods applies her expert knowledge of the teaching of rhetoric in medieval education to consider how teachers and students interacted with three literary works that were fundamental to medieval teaching—the Aeneid, the Achilleid, and the Ilias latina. Through close attention to glosses, highlighting, and formatting of manuscript copies of these works, Woods reveals that the education of medieval men regularly featured learning emotions through guided concentration on the experiences of fictional women. Although part of an overall focus on emotional passages and speeches in medieval classrooms, Woods's evidence shows that students and teachers paid notably greater attention to the words of distraught women. In order to help decipher repeated and at times cryptic manuscript features, Woods places them firmly in the context of classical and medieval rhetorical treatises, which offers an insightful view of classroom lessons and their underlying “course...

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