Walt Hunter's study of contemporary poetry and globalization, Forms of a World: Contemporary Poetry and the Making of Globalization, opens with two provocative questions, “What happens when we think of poetry as a global literary genre and when we think of the global in poetic terms?” (1). These questions situate Hunter's interdisciplinary examination of contemporary poetry by raising to the fore his most immediate contribution, which is to think “of poetry in global terms,” by turning to the writing of anglophone poets “from a variety of positions in the world economy” (120). Hunter argues for an analysis of globalization through poetic forms and an analysis of poetry through a global framework: both must be examined within the economic and political lineages that link them together inextricably. He ultimately creates an argument for global poetry to be taken up as an ally of globalization, specifically through a critique of global...

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