Taking as its point of departure the supposition of a “a closure of ethical and political thinking under neoliberalism,” Erin Graff Zivin's Anarcheaologies proposes the deconstructive “misreading” of literature as an interpretative practice that, eschewing the predominance of Foucauldian genealogies and identity politics in cultural theory, ostensibly exposes the reader to untranslatable difference, opening ideological foreclosures to an ethics of encounter and thereby political dissent. Graff Zivin associates this practice of “anarcheaological misreading” with concepts drawn primarily from Badiou, de Man, Derrida, Levinas, and Rancière that coalesce around the tropes of blindness, misunderstanding, and error, all of which aim at disrupting ideological certainties and disciplinary categories, thereby placing into question “those forms of ethics and politics rooted in logics of identification, recognition, and comprehension” (11). Somewhat akin to the surrealist technique of objective chance, this form of reading aims to suppress the rationalization of difference, particularly in its reliance on...

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