Anhalt's Enraged is written in the belief that “ancient Greek myths offer a nonpartisan critique of rage and they validate alternatives. They invite the audience to think deliberately about the effect of stories on human choices and goals” (6). In the twenty-first century when political and moral positions have become increasingly polarized, these myths can especially help since “the audience may have no vested interest in the story's outcome and can approach the issues without passion or partisanship” (6). Anhalt seems largely unconcerned about the cultural wars that have centered on privileging works of “dead western white males."

The main text is divided into six chapters, together with an introduction and conclusion. The first four chapters are devoted to Homer's Iliad. Anhalt only briefly touches on “The Homeric Question”: who was Homer and how did his epics, products of an oral tradition, come into a written form? All chapters...

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