Borges's jubilant eclecticism has inspired an equally diverse scholarly response. Much of it could be characterized as a genre of “Borges and …,” in which readers isolate one aspect of the oeuvre and, in many cases, bring to bear on Borges's writing an expertise that, in conventional terms, at least, exceeds Borges's own. Thus, consulting a bibliography of Borges Studies, we might begin to compose a catalogue: Borges and Latin America, Argentina, or Buenos Aires; Borges and modernism, mathematics, or metaphysics; Borges and philosophy (continental, analytic, or “literary,” not to mention individual philosophers such as Kant or Schopenhauer, Peirce or Plato); Borges and religion (Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, or Christianity, in dogmatic or heretical forms); Borges and space, visual art, and his predecessors or successors; and so on. As her own bibliography acknowledges, Laura Jansen's Borges' Classics is not the first to do Borges and the classics. Her expertise in scholarship...

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