Philology is a hot topic these days. After the ascendance and decline of theory, the seemingly old-fashioned study of language, manuscripts, print, and textual criticism—the factum of history, in Vico's terminology, as opposed to the verum of philosophy—has been repristinated into something urgent, critical, and generative. Some recent interventions include James Turner's Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities (Princeton University Press, 2014), World Philology, edited by Sheldon Pollock, Benjamin A. Elman, and Kevin Ku-ming Chang (Harvard University Press, 2015), Werner Hamacher's Minima Philologica (Fordham University Press, 2015), Canonical Texts and Scholarly Practices: A Global Comparative Approach, edited by Anthony Grafton and Glenn Most (Cambridge University Press, 2016), Jeffrey Masten's Queer Philology (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), Sarah Kay's Philology's Vomit (Chronos Verlag, 2017), and ‘Pataphilology: An Irreader, edited by Sean Gurd and Vicent W. J. van Gerven Oei (Punctum Books, 2018). And now John...

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