Zhaoming Qian's relatively slim volume East-West Exchange and Late Modernism: Williams, Moore, Pound, is in many ways a continuation of Qian's earlier works—The Modernist Response to Chinese Art (2003) and Orientalism and Modernism (1995). By taking (as the title announces) the exploration of the East–West exchange into “late modernism,” which Qian defines as “the post-1945 renewals of early twentieth-century modernism” (1), Qian argues that interaction with “the east” enriched and revitalized the late careers of William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, and Ezra Pound. Overall, he argues that these poets are responding to postmodernism by returning to modernist ideas of “depersonalization, anti-mimesis, and interculturalism” (57). The intercultural influence, Qian argues, rejuvenates their “enthusiasm for experimentation” (11) and thereby imbues their late work—and modernism itself—with new energy.

After an introduction setting up the resurgence of modernism in the postwar period, Qian then spends two chapters on each poet in turn....

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