Incomparable Empires is premised on the fact that the cross-pollination of ideas across national and cultural borders involves translation and multilingual exchanges. Returning to a pivotal historical moment—the Spanish–American War of 1898 and its aftermath—author Gayle Rogers reopens conversations about the relationship between nationalism, modernism, and empire among writers from the fallen empire of Spain and the rising superpower of the United States. In today's militantly monolinguistic society (in the United States), this is a refreshing reminder that translation is messy and difficult, dependent on the linguistic abilities of the actors involved as well as their intentions, beliefs, and convictions; translation is a fundamental element of intercultural communication with real consequences for intellectual life. Rogers compellingly argues for an understanding of the modernist canon on both sides of the Atlantic that resists the monolingual, nativist tendencies that came to dominate both US and Spanish studies in the twentieth century. Incomparable...

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