This book examines al-Andalus in contemporary Arab and Hispanic narratives with a focus on the “crucial role of coloniality and the linked issues of migration and gender” and “how al-Andalus, as a site of cultural contact, is presented and used today.” It is not, as the author points out from the beginning, “a search for al-Andalus per se but for what people make of it a millennium later” (3). This is an important distinction because of how al-Andalus can and has been invoked by “diametrically opposed ideological positions”—the author cites, for example, Osama bin Laden's deputy Ayman al-Zawahiri who “vowed that the tragedy of the fall of al-Andalus would not be repeated” and former President Barack Obama who, in a famous 2009 speech in Cairo, “cited al-Andalus, and specifically Cordoba, as an example of religious tolerance in the Muslim tradition” (2). The book begins with an extensive and excellent introduction...

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