In Literary Translation and the Idea of a Minor Romania, Sean Cotter highlights the importance of translating major Western European works into Romanian under the Soviet occupation of the 1950s for defining a new, complex identity for the Romanian canonical authors Lucian Blaga, Constantin Noica, and Emil Cioran. Connecting individual identity with the country's position in the aftermath of the World War II, the book skillfully uses translation theories intertwined with postcolonial theory to emphasize the culturally productive way in which a “minor” nation can begin to define itself and solidify its mode of being in relation to an occupation regime. Cotter recognizes the underlining tension of comparison between “minor” and “major” nations and their engagement with translation as a means of identity formation, especially in moments of contact and occupation, and tries to avoid them as much as possible throughout the four chapters of the book.

Indebted to...

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