China Reinterpreted analyzes a series of noh plays, mainly composed in the Muromachi period of Japan (1392–1477), that feature Chinese stories and characters. Its overall approach is to see these plays as representations of China, which in the author's eyes constituted a foreign “other” in the Japanese cultural world. The study organizes plays into groups reflecting a set of stances they adopt toward this “other”: auspicious (Seiōbo, Tōbōsaku, Tsurukame), sympathized and distant (Shōkun and Yōkihi), exotic (Shakkyō and Ryōko), destructive (Haku Rakuten and Zegai), and harmonious (Sanshō and Tōsen).

A burden for books like this is that they cannot assume knowledge in their readers, and so they both have the task of presenting information and that of theorizing about it. If the information is reliable and presented in a detached fashion it can be very useful for reference of others...

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