In Locating the Destitute: Space and Identity in Caribbean Fiction, Stanka Radović shows how anglophone and francophone Caribbean novels reclaim space for those made destitute by displacement, slavery, and neocolonial oppression through humor, exuberant language, and communal solidarity. Radović draws largely on Henri Lefebvre's seminal work The Production of Space, while also engaging a range of other geographers and literary critics including Edward Soja, Doreen Massey, Michel Foucault, Homi Bhabha, Frantz Fanon, Antonio Benítez-Rojo, and Edouard Glissant. A vital objective of the study is to interrogate the persistence of spatial metaphors in postcolonial writing and “their triumphant yet inevitably failing answer to the experience of spatial destitution” (45). For Radović, the celebratory rhetoric about space that pervades much postcolonial literature and criticism only underscores the “absence of autonomous location” for “dispossessed individuals and communities [who] cannot indulge in the luxury of metaphorical crossings,” and whose “confinement and deprivations...

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