As Boris Maslov accurately notes, “Alexander Veselovsky's versatile body of work is notably hard to synthesize” and “does not lend itself easily to either systematic summary or piecemeal extraction” (128). This ambitious volume, however, aims at the very least to recover Veselovsky's contributions, related to but not necessarily integrated with more familiar movements in Russian and Soviet formalism and various subsequent models of structuralism. The authors of articles in the volume are members of the “Historical Poetics Working Group,” whose 2011 conference at the University of Chicago (“Historical Poetics: Past, Present, and Future”) provided the proximal impetus for the volume, but more importantly, represents an on-going effort to reanimate the study of literary history and genre by recovering and reinterpreting Veselovsky's contributions in a contemporary context. Alexander Veselovsky (1838–1906) was primarily concerned with the development of an elaborate theory of poetic form, integrated with an interesting (but problematic) claim that...

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