In his 2017 Nobel Lecture, Kazuo Ishiguro makes a slightly lugubrious remark on the new century we are living in, before reaffirming the importance of literature and appealing for more diversity in our common literary world. To the Japanese-born British novelist's dismay, the present world is a “much smaller” place than he had ever imagined, and our time is “of dangerously increasing division.”1 Having taken “the unstoppable advance of liberal-humanist values” in Europe and America for granted, Ishiguro admits that it may have been “an illusion,” and that he has been “living for some years in a bubble.”2 His pessimism is not unusual in our time, and with good reasons—the terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, 2001, the invasion of Iraq in 2003, the financial crash of 2008, the European Union (EU) refugee crisis, and the proliferation of Far Right ideologies and nationalisms in Europe,...

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