Ulka Anjaria's Realism in the Twentieth-Century Indian Novel challenges conventional ways of understanding both realism as a form and the formal attributes of Indian fiction. Over five chapters, it details the emergence and development of the realist novel in India from the late nineteenth to the middle of the twentieth century. It offers a thought-provoking reexamination of key novels in Hindi, English, and Bengali, including Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay's Anandamath, Rabindranath Tagore's Ghare Baire, Munshi Premchand's Godan, Mulk Raj Anand's Coolie, Raja Rao's Kanthapura, Ahmed Ali's Twilight in Delhi, and Bibhutibhushan Bandopadhyay's Aparajito. Anjaria argues that whereas magical realism has come to be privileged both as the hallmark of third world and postcolonial writing, and as the method that such writing uses to challenge the politics of colonial modernity, in colonial and newly independent India realism was the mode through which writers engaged with...

You do not currently have access to this content.