The Oxford Handbook of Global Modernisms is an indispensable handbook for the new modernist studies. It reflects the contours of a field, which, from the 1990s onward, has steadily shifted from the internationalism of England, France, and Germany to an expansive engagement with non-European literatures; from a focus on high art to an investment in modes of exchange between elite and popular culture. Global modernism differs from its international predecessor in large part because it has adapted the lessons of postcolonial studies to its own methodologies even as the term “global” continues to raise suspicion within that adjacent field and will no doubt continue to do so. Mark Wollaeger and Matt Eatough are aware of the potential land mines embedded in their keyword, which some might see as synonymous with imperialism and appropriation, but Wollaeger's introduction convincingly addresses and, for the most part, eludes such collusions. The definition and practice...

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