In 2016 two groundbreaking books were published that tell the story of the Armenians who survived the 1915–21 genocide by the Ottoman state, and who live in the shadows of the postgenocide denialism of the Turkish state. Lerna Ekmekçioğlu's highly acclaimed book focuses on the period from the close of World War I to the early 1930s.1 Talin Suciyan's work, The Armenians in Modern Turkey: Post-Genocide Society, Politics and History, reviewed here, is focused on the period from the 1930s to 1950, and most densely in the period from 1945 to 1950.

Using extensive and wide-ranging Armenian-language primary sources, these two books explore a hitherto-neglected dimension of the wider scholarly terrain that has come to be known as Armenian-Turkish Studies. The intellectual project pioneered by the Workshop for Armenian and Turkish Studies (WATS), based at the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor paved the way for the proliferation of sophisticated,...

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