The Kurds are a stateless nation and are a significant minority in Iran, Iraq, Turkey, and Syria. The total Kurdish population is estimated to be thirty-five million, which makes them the fourth most populous group in the Middle East. Political developments in Iraq and Syria in the past decade have increased the importance of the Kurds as a regional actor, and as a result, there has been an increase in scholarly work on different aspects of Kurdish politics and society in the recent years. A People without a State provides an account of Kurdish history from the seventh to the early twentieth century.

The book begins with a discussion of the Kurds' origins and draws our attention to their ancient roots: “the Kurds have been mentioned in texts since antiquity and throughout the Islamic era” (1). The author's search for the Kurds' ethnic origin leads him to repeat a popularly...

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