There have been many new books on Salafism in general and in Lebanon in particular since the beginning of the “Arab Spring” in 2011. Nadine Elali, Genevieve Abdo, Alexandre Corbeil, Robert Fisk, and Daniel Harris are but a few of the names of those writing about Salafism and Salafists in Lebanon, and their work has offered deep insight into the Salafist phenomenon in Lebanon.1 Robert G. Rabil's contribution to this topic does not break new ground. However, as he states in his introduction, “despite some significant studies by Western and Arab scholars, research on Salafism has, more or less, remained shrouded with misconception and confusion … and little or random research has been undertaken on Salafism as a product and expression of its emergence and development in most countries” (1) In this respect, Robert G. Rabil claims that his work was a result of “insufficient knowledge about and thus...

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