This study is captivating and painful at the same time. It starts with the title of the book, which is slightly misleading; it includes much more than an ethnographer's participation in an obscure practice of young and bored people in Saudi Arabia. The book is equally rich in its portrayal of the kingdom's urban history and societal analysis of its citizens. Furthermore, it is noteworthy because it is not about the political, business, or religious elites, but the marginalized elements of Saudi society. In a nutshell, Pascal Menoret writes about young Bedouins who revolt on the roads of Saudi Arabia's capital because they were deported by princes and developers and marginalized by the administration and the economy (p. 206). He describes their road violence as a form of political rebellion (p. 5).

The book is fairly split between three components: reflections on the author's fieldwork, descriptions of drifting and drifters,...

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