The centennial of World War I saw an abundance of books, articles, monographs, and conferences dealing with the history of the Great War, its memory and legacy, in its different fronts. The scholarship on the European experience of the war traditionally discussed both the “war front” and the “home front” of the war, while making the connection between the two “fronts” and the combined political, diplomatic, cultural, and social histories of this pivotal event. However, the historiography of the Middle Eastern theaters of war focused for many years on specific aspects of the Great War, with a clear preference for its political, diplomatic, and military dimensions, while neglecting many other crucial questions and themes. Those included, for example, the experience of civilians, everyday life during the war, the effects of the war on women and children, the ways the war had changed the urban environment, as well as the war's...

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