A look at the history of Palestinian literature shows us that there have been very few books that have collected stories of the 1948 Nakba (“catastrophe”) between 1948 and the 1990s, the first four decades after the Nakba. After 1967, the PLO shaped the memory of the Nakba, and for years, primarily ideological literature has been written about it, using it as a recruitment tool for the national struggle and as a source of encouragement to carry on the armed struggle. The personal and familial stories of the Nakba, rooted in psychological trauma, remained virtually untold.1

A new era of Palestinian literature began in the 1990s, particularly after the signing of the Oslo Accords in 1993 and the new possibility for a Palestinian state. The new era brought to light biographies and personal accounts of refugees in which they described their struggles coping with trauma associated with the 1948...

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