Emily Gottreich’s book, Jewish Morocco, offers a fascinating approach to reading the Moroccan past, which has been promoted by recent scholarship on Moroccan Jewish history, society, and culture. Indeed, her study is not, as she states in the book’s introduction, a history of the Jews of Morocco, but rather a history of Morocco from the perspective of its Jews (3). In so doing, the book offers a synthetic history based on secondary sources that seeks to incorporate the main findings of excellent studies on Morocco’s Jewish community that have been published over the past two decades (vi). Before discussing the book itself, it is important to understand this new approach to Moroccan Jewish history, which is the backbone of this book. Scholars like Gottreich (University of California, Berkeley), who promote this approach, view the study of Moroccan (and other Middle Eastern and North African) Jewish settings as a way...

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