Among the many episodes of the Lebanese Civil War (1975–90), the “War of the Mountain” (Ḥarb al-Jabal, 1982–84) has been one of the most myth-shattering ones. Challenging the comforting idea that the main drivers of civil strife in Lebanon were external powers that war pitted two communities against each other, the Druze and the Maronites, which prewar “national” historiography had often portrayed as the historical core components of modern Lebanese statehood. The war's theater, the Jabal, is a mountainous area comprising the southern districts of today's Mount Lebanon governorate, namely, Shuf, Aley and parts of Baabda (Upper Metn). It had great symbolic significance for both groups as well as for the history and geopolitics of modern Lebanon. In ethnoreligious terms, it had been a “mixed” area in which periods of peaceful intercommunal cooperation had alternated with periods of violent conflict. On the military level, as a conflict...

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