Ten years after the Arab uprisings, the scholarly community is preoccupied with assessing their legacy on the politics of the Arab world. Several scholars and analysts have focused on the mostly negative outcomes, pointing out that the early expectations of the triumph of democracy have ended with the retrenchment of authoritarianism, civil conflicts, and greater ideological and sectarian polarization. Other scholars have sounded a more positive note, suggesting that the uprisings have dispelled the notion that Arab citizens are inclined to accept authoritarianism and are unable to confront entrenched ruling elites with demands for radical democratic change. These scholars point to the success of the Tunisian transition and the widespread collapse of the wall of fear as evidence for their claims, suggesting therefore that the revolutionary moment, in the words of the editors of this book, is not over, as the protests in Algeria, Sudan, Lebanon, and Iraq in 2019...

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