The Making of the Modern Mediterranean: Views from the South grew out of a 2013 conference at Georgetown University, “The Mediterranean Re-imagined,” which was convened in memory of the late historian of the early modern Mediterranean and Georgetown faculty member, Faruk Tabak. As the title suggests, the objective of the conference and the collected volume was to rethink the Mediterranean from the perspective of its southern shore. This is not, of course, a new idea. When the father of modern Mediterranean studies, Fernand Braudel, settled on the sea as the focus of his dissertation in the 1930s, inspired by his years as a teacher in French Algeria, he determined to approach his topic “upside down,” as he described it, that is from the south looking north, rather than from the traditional, obverse vantage point. In doing so, he hoped to break down the “walled gardens” that constrained history within narrow...

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