Buster’s revised dissertation begins from the thesis that “forms of storytelling matter” (p. 6), which is brilliantly simple and anything but simplistic. Her analysis of historical summaries in the Hebrew Bible and Qumran documents deftly combines insights from memory studies and new formalism, particularly of Caroline Levine, to demonstrate that this storytelling form has social, literary, and mnemonic utilities. Key to Buster’s analysis and contribution is the clarity with which she distinguishes between literary forms and genres. This enables her to demonstrate how the historical summary form traverses historical and literary contexts as a carrier and shaper of collective memory and identity. In her analysis of the historical summary form, Buster moves beyond questions about how this literary form functioned in its original Sitz im Leben or Sitz im Buch to questions about how the form continued to “influence a culture’s remembering practices in the present” (p. 17). Buster convincingly...

You do not currently have access to this content.