Culp’s study of Deuteronomy’s often-noted emphasis on memory recovers and develops what Culp refers to as an “overgrown path” (p. 8) within biblical studies, typified by the work of Childs’ Memory and Tradition in Ancient Israel and Schottroff’s Gedenken im Alten Orient und im Alten Testament. Since both works were published in the early 1960’s, the authors did not have access to the information now available from the field of memory studies that explains the workings of collective and individual memory. Though some biblical studies scholars have integrated aspects of memory studies into their work, Culp demonstrates that this work has focused on understanding the biblical texts as products of memory, rather than as producers of memory. In other words, the integration between biblical studies and memory studies has been focused on the world behind the text so that the text can be interpreted as a representation of collective...

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