Despite its enormous popularity and wide circulation in the early church, rarely do NT introductions mention Tatian’s (T) Diatessaron (D). If mentioned at all, the thin summary provided readers features D as the antagonist (among others) in the complicated history of the earliest reception of the canonical Gospels prior to Irenaeus’s witness of their fourfold collection in Against Heresies. Not only is mention often made of T’s alleged heterodoxy but that his “Gospel of the Connected,” as Ephraen the Syrian called it, presents the earliest example of Gospel harmonization found wanting by modern criticism, which smooths over the awkward diversity of the four Gospels. Moreover, the sheer scope of Diatessaronic studies—the languages one needs to master, the manuscript traditions one needs to control, the awareness of the sociohistorical diversity that marks out D’s trajectory into the ecclesial east and west—easily frustrates the faint of scholarly heart.

This third offering...

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