In a revised form of his dissertation at the University of Nottingham under Professor Roland Deines, Dr. Timothy Murray contributes the following volume to the growing field of NT wealth ethics. Specifically, Murray is concerned with when, how, and why the first Christians restricted their material generosity. The focus on restriction is a novelty among studies of NT wealth ethics. The argument of the book is arranged around two parts that are further separated into nine chapters. After situating his argument within the field of NT ethics in general and wealth ethics in particular, Murray helpfully clarifies some of the terms used throughout the volume (ch. 1). Murray depends heavily on the “implicit ethics” model of Ruben Zimmermann throughout his work. The first half of the monograph is devoted to comparative studies (chs. 2–5). Specifically, individual chapters detail the restricted generosity of Roman oikos (ch. 3), Greco-Roman associations (ch. 4),...

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