The volume under review is the published dissertation of Dominik Wolff, written under the direction of Florian Wilk, defended at the University of Göttingen in 2015. Wolff investigates the self-presentation of Paul to the Corinthian community in 1 Corinthians. Wolff concludes that Paul consistently presents himself as a Hellenistic sage worthy of emulation, a presentation carefully chosen for the situation of “wisdom-seeking” in Corinth. Wolff aspires to answer two question. First, the question of compositional and thematic unity. Paul’s carefully crafted self-representation becomes the framework for understanding 1 Cor as a cohesive and unified letter. Second, and more prominently, is the question of understanding Paul in the Greco-Roman milieu. Wolff reads Paul in the Greco-Roman philosophical tradition, making a significant contribution by providing a thorough historical-exegetical methodology to support this reading.

Wolff’s historical-exegetical method provides the structure of the entire work in two parts. The five chapters of part one...

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