Jennie Grillo’s chapter on the Susanna narrative opens this collection aimed at understanding how women, both real and symbolic, are connected to questions of Judean identity after the Babylonian exile. For Grillo, Susanna is symbolic, set against the backdrop of the frequent woman-as-city trope in the Hebrew Bible and other ANE cultures. Grillo argues that Susanna’s story is a redemptive reworking of this trope because of Susanna’s ability to triumph over evil corruption by staring down her accusers and not allowing false guilt and shame to defeat her. The story is a polemic of the present against the past that opens up a hopeful path away from exilic shame and trauma toward holy faithfulness in the present. The story thus purifies the typically negative metaphor of the woman-as-city, perhaps as a kind of prophetic fulfillment of texts such as Isa 54’s promise that Zion will forget her shame in exchange...

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