It has been nearly a century since the state of Tennessee prosecuted John Thomas Scopes in the so-called “Scopes Monkey Trial” (1925). When the Volunteer State passed the Butler Act prohibiting the teaching of evolution in public schools, the ACLU found their accomplice in substitute biology teacher John Scopes to challenge the constitutionality of the law. As is well documented, the lead defense attorney Clarence Darrow cornered the lead prosecutor William Jennings Bryan into pitting the Bible against science. Scopes lost the case and $100, but the most significant loss was intellectualism within evangelicalism. Since Tennessee v. Scopes, the rift between science and faith has only grown wider and more profound.

In the decades to follow numerous efforts have been made to demonstrate the importance for Christians—Evangelicals, in particular—of embracing critical thinking and empirical inquiry. Among the most formative works are Bernard Ramm, The Christian View of Science and...

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