The Elder Testament lays claim to the OT’s astonishing sweep and power, its strangeness and otherness, resisting what might be best described as a hermeneutic of domestication. This volume registers the mature perspective and distilled thought of a career’s worth of scholarly curiosities, probing, and critical inquiry. Having studied under its author, I believed I could work my way quickly through this volume. I was wrong. The Elder Testament is the product of a life’s labor and demands a patient hearing and following after the author’s thought: a five-course meal rather than a quick bite to eat.

The Elder Testament aims to provide a theological grammar for Christian sense-making of the first part of our Christian Bibles, the part most Christians call the OT. For multiple reasons, communities of OT reception and reading struggle with the connotative force of Old in Old Testament. The term feels tired and dusty,...

You do not currently have access to this content.