Pang begins ch. 1 (pp. 9–65) by noting that English researchers tend toward a consolidation of aspect and Aktionsart, while continental and Slavic researchers tend toward their distinction (p. 12). He helpfully begins with early Greek philosophers (pp. 13–44). Aristotle, early Alexandrian grammarians, and the Stoics were all precursors to modern taxonomies of tense and aspect (p. 14), and English scholars Gilbert Ryle, Anthony Kenny, and Zeno Vendler were each influenced by Aristotle’s ontological classification of verbs, that is, whether verbs entail the “concept of completion . . . τέλειος” (pp. 16, 17–18, 31–33). Telicity gradually becomes central for identifying verbal aspect, specifically perfective aspect (p. 34). Vendler’s quadripartition of English verbs (e.g., activities, accomplishments, achievements, and states) becomes seminal for subsequent English grammarians (p. 32). In the discussion of compositionality (pp. 34–44), or “the meaning of a complex expression. . . computable on the basis of its constituent...

You do not currently have access to this content.