Joshua Jipp offers exegetically defensible support for the idea that hospitality should be a key identity marker for Christians today. Jipp’s argument is clear, concise, and straightforward: God is found to be hospitable in Scripture, and this calls forth a pattern of embodiment among believers that similarly reflects an ethos of hospitality. Jipp defines hospitality as “the act or process whereby the identity of the stranger is transformed into that of a guest” (p. 2). This others-oriented perspective is a much-needed corrective to current NT ethical scholarship and reflects the narratives found in Luke–Acts, John, and Paul. Jipp’s approach ends up offering a fine example of what narrative theology might produce when exegetical and ethical reflection are combined.

Part one begins with an initial focus on Luke–Acts, the texts Jipp has previously written about. As mentioned, here the divine-human experience finds its strongest exegetical grounding. Of particular interest is the...

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